Another Earth

2011

Drama / Romance

75
Rotten Tomatoes Critics - Fresh 63%
Rotten Tomatoes Audience - Upright 66%
IMDb Rating 7.0

Synopsis


Uploaded By: YIFY
Downloaded 67,054 times
November 1, 2011 at 10:29 am

Director

Cast

Brit Marling as Rhoda Williams
William Mapother as John Burroughs
DJ Flava as DJ Flava
720p
600.13 MB
1280*692
English
PG-13
English
23.976 fps
1hr 32 min
P/S 12 / 49

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by Howard Schumann 9 / 10

A quietly powerful work of art

""O wad some Power the gift tae gie us, to see oursels as ithers see us!" – Robert Burns

Beginning as a blue speck in the far distant horizon, in four years a new planet resembling Earth has moved into our solar system, creating a hovering phantom-like globe in the sky that puzzles scientists and laymen alike, but brings a feeling of wonder to the night sky. Winner of the Alfred P. Sloan Feature Film and the Jury Prize at the Sundance Film Festival, Mike Cahill's low-budget film, Another Earth, is a quietly beautiful meditation on guilt, redemption, and second chances. Though it has some implausible elements, it is so skillfully written and performed that these elements seem irrelevant. Cahill demonstrates that science fiction movies do not have to have blaring music, unending frenzy, CGI effects, or ugly and violent monsters to successfully capture our imagination.

The premise of the film is that the new planet is an exact mirror of the Earth, containing a duplicate version of ourselves who mirror our earthly circumstances. Cahill's main focus, however, is not the new planet but the attachment between two damaged individuals who begin to bring each other back to life after a devastating incident that forever scarred their lives. As the film opens, Rhoda Williams (Brit Marling), a bright 17-year old, unsteady after a night of celebrating her acceptance into MIT, drives her car through a red light, putting composer John Burroughs (William Mapother) in a coma and killing his pregnant wife and their young son.

The film then jumps ahead four years when the still guilt-ridden and morose Rhoda is released from prison and tries to set her life in order, moving back with her parents Kim (Jordan Baker) and Robert (Flint Beverage), and her brother Jeff (Robin Taylor). Though she had planned on studying Astrophysics, the only job she can now get is working as a high school janitor, a job where she keeps to herself without much interaction with others. When she sees John placing a toy robot at the site of the accident, on a whim she goes to his house pretending to be a maid offering a free trial for a cleaning service oddly called "Maid in Heaven."

In the back of her mind, however, is finding a way to release her inner torment. Fascinated with this sullen but obviously highly intelligent woman, John takes her up on her offer and asks her to come back each week to clean his house. At first uncommunicative both verbally and emotionally, the two alienated people slowly begin opening up to each other a little bit more each week. Though Rhoda eventually plans to tell John that she was responsible for the accident that killed his family, their visits seem to bring them to a new awakening of what is possible in their life, and she repeatedly postpones her confession.

After listening to TV broadcasts talking constantly about the possibility that your identical twin on Earth 2 might be a happier and more satisfied version of you, Rhoda enters a contest to become the first voyager to visit the other Earth. Astonishingly, she wins first prize after a heart rendering essay describing the reasons she wants to go. At first, pleading with her not to go through with it, John's attitude is changed drastically after she reveals her complicity in the fatal accident, a scene that leads to a startling and unpredictable conclusion.

Supported by the ethereal sounds of the group "Fall on Your Sword," Another Earth engenders powerful performances that deserve recognition at awards time. Marling, who also co-wrote the film, gives an intense and moving performance that brings her character fully to life. Though the film misses an important teachable moment near the end, it is a quietly powerful work of art that suggests that truth lays more in inner than in outer space, and that the biggest world to conquer is the one that is right before our eyes. As author Marcel Proust put it, "The real voyage of discovery lies in not seeing new landscapes but in having new eyes."

Reviewed by David Ferguson (fergusontx@gmail.com) 7 / 10

This Me or That Me?

Greetings again from the darkness. An award winning film at Sundance, this one seems to carry the same polarizing effect that "Tree of Life" does. The reviews and comments have been discordant and contentious. After sitting through a Q&A with Mike Cahill (co-writer, director) and Brit Marling (co-writer, star) I am guessing they are taking great pride in the love/hate responses. Their film was designed to take you deep ... make you think and self-analyze. This is not a fluffy Owen Wilson rom-com. Explaining what it is, well, that's a challenge.

The story begins with Rhoda (Brit Marling) out for a night of partying. We learn she has been accepted to M.I.T. and that she is quite the space and astronomy lover. Her very poor decision to drive home after drinking results in a horrific accident that changes her life and that of a young family. At the same time, scientists discover "another Earth" has been hiding on the other side of the sun. Flash forward four years as Rhoda is released from prison.

She is a broken spirit whose bright future has been dashed. She tracks down the man who survived the crash she caused and has every intention of apologizing. Instead, she cleans his house. She finds John (William Mapother) has dropped out of society and found numbness in the bottle.

I won't say more about the story because it is really something to watch unfold. What I will say is that I found the advertisements to be somewhat misleading. This is not a sci-fi film per se. Sure the second earth brings about numerous questions concerning the "other" us. What would we say? How would we react? Have I done better there than here? But that is actually an underlying element to this story ... always present in our thoughts and those of Rhoda. Instead, this film is a psychological drama. And a dark one at that.

You will recognize William Mapother (The Grudge, Lost), who plays John. He has a regular guy look to him and stretches well from happiness to depression to, once again, showing a spark. Brit Marling is one you don't know, but will soon enough. She is an amazing presence on screen and avoids the Hollywood acting crutches. She plays Rhoda as the damaged, confused creature she is in the story. Very well done.

A couple of other interesting notes include Kumar Pallana (The Royal Tenenbaums)as Purdeep. With minimal screen time, his character provides Rhoda with a lesson she needs. There is also a scene where John plays a saw as a musical instrument. The sound is amazing and the music is actually from Natalia Paruz, who is knows as the "saw lady". Other music in the film is outstanding and courtesy of Fall on Your Sword. Very unique, but a perfect fit for the film.

Reviewed by jesus-100-984521 9 / 10

Suspend disbelief, and love this movie

I am a psychiatrist and psychotherapist who can tell a hawk from a handsaw, and there is a wonderful handsaw in this movie. So, I feel qualified to tell you it is safe to see this movie as it is, without worrying about details like gravity. Do not allow unimaginative naysayers to keep you from enjoying this gem. I mean, we all can enjoy vampire and zombie movies, right? Is any movie any better than "Let the Right One In"? I saw this movie last night in Brookline Mass at a Q&A preview, with director, writers, and an actor -- all combined in two lovely people. No one in our sophisticated audience that included a CETI scientist cared enough about the "laws of physics" problems to mention them in the question period. All we cared about were the endearing characters, the music both acoustic and visual, the plot developments, the shocking climaxes, the compelling emotional plausibility.

The movie is not about anything as terrestrial as gravity. In the world of this movie, something has happened to upset some kind of cosmic symmetry, and the other earth has appeared from a parallel universe. I do wish some character or other had dispelled the physics with "I don't know why our orbits are not affected". But, the metaphor works as a way to discuss looking at oneself. It really does not matter. The acting is perfect, the camera-work perfectly beautiful, the plot deeply affecting with wonderful surprises.

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