Hitchcock

2012

Biography / Drama

174
Rotten Tomatoes Critics - Fresh 62%
Rotten Tomatoes Audience - Upright 60%
IMDb Rating 6.9

Synopsis


Uploaded By: YIFY
Downloaded 57,652 times
March 5, 2013 at 5:19 pm

Director

Cast

Anthony Hopkins as Alfred Hitchcock
Helen Mirren as Alma Reville
Scarlett Johansson as Janet Leigh
Danny Huston as Whitfield Cook
720p 1080p
701.03 MB
1280*528
English
PG-13
English
23.976 fps
1hr 38 min
P/S 4 / 17
1.51 GB
1920*800
English
PG-13
English
23.976 fps
1hr 38 min
P/S 6 / 31

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by David Ferguson (fergusontx@gmail.com) 7 / 10

Call me Hitch, drop the ...

Greetings again from the darkness. Here goes: John J McLaughlin wrote this "Hitchcock" screenplay based on Stephen Rebello's book "Alfred Hitchcock and the Making of Psycho", which was based on the filming of the Psycho screenplay from Joseph Stefano, which was loosely based on Robert Bloch's book, which was based on the real life crimes of Ed Gein. Whew!

It's kind of interesting that Alfred Hitchcock is hot again. His Vertigo recently displaced Citizen Kane as the all-time greatest film. HBO is still running their recent production of "The Girl", which is based on Hitchcock's making of "The Birds" and his unhealthy connection to Tippi Hedren. And now, we get this Hollywood production, supposedly based on the master of suspense. I saw supposedly, because this film plays like it was written by the heirs of Alma Reville, Hitch's long time wife and collaborator. We all knew she worked on his films and contributed ideas, but the film wants you to believe she was the real genius behind the public genius.

The movie is entitled "Hitchcock" and is based on the making of "Psycho", but in fact, it's more the story of Alma and her husband. While there is nothing wrong with that story ... in fact, it is quite interesting and entertaining ... it's just kind of false advertising.

Helen Mirren portrays Alma, and instead of the mousy woman who usually faded into the background, we see a fairly strong and talented woman who goes toe-to-toe with Hitch in her best scene. Sir Anthony Hopkins dons some facial appliances and a fat suit and does a solid job of capturing the odd, creepy, leering, disturbed, insecure genius we recognize as Alfred Hitchcock. He comes across as louder and more in-motion than what we have previously seen. And while director Sacha Gervasi makes it clear that Hitch is not a "normal" guy, he doesn't dwell too much on the blond fixations.

The emphasis on the skills and importance of Alma would be fine were it not so exaggerated. Surely every great director and writer and artist has a muse and/or support system; and, there is no question Alma was a very talented lady, but her strength here bordered on distracting to the overall picture. Especially needless was the storyline of Alma being attracted to screenwriter Whitfield Cook (Danny Huston), who wrote "Strangers on a Train" for Hitchcock.

The Hitchcock humor is allowed to shine through and his battles with Paramount Studio head Barney Balaban (Richard Portnow) and the censorship board (Kurtwood Smith) are excellent. Hopkins finds the humanity under the fat suit and is especially good in his work with Scarlett Johansson (as Janet Leigh) and Jessica Biel (as Vera Miles). I also got a kick out of James D'Arcy as the affected Anthony Perkins and all his quirky mannerisms.

Though this barely qualifies as a story on the making of Psycho, it was chilling to watch the addition of Bernard Herrmann's iconic score added to the shower scene. In fact, Danny Elfman does a nice job of subtly adding a Herrmann-type score to this film. I'm not sure if the film will play well with real Hitchcock aficionados, but if you can forgive the Alma slant, it's actually quite interesting and entertaining and kind of a sweet film at its core.

Reviewed by Will Engell 10 / 10

Great Film

When I first saw the preview for Hitchcock, I knew it would be right up my alley. I mean its about Alfred Hitchcock and what he went through to produce easily one of the greatest horror films of all time. And to top it all off Anthony Hopkins Plays Hitch himself, and when it comes to Hopkins, he brings his A-game to every single role. This movie blew me away, the acting is spot on, the cinematography is excellent, almost shot like an early horror movie in my opinion, lighting is precise and the music fits the mood and the story perfectly. I don't remember the last time I had so much fun watching a movie. Watch this one, its a gem!

Reviewed by JT Lancer 4 / 10

This Could More Accurately Have Been Called "Alma"

After the appalling & fraudulent character assassination last year that was "The Girl", I'd looked forward to seeing this biography in hopes it would redress the balance somewhat, & to some degree it does that, especially in its showing the long, devoted partnership between Hitch & his wife Alma.

It's hard not to compare the two films, & I have to say I think Toby Jones' Hitchcock was far more convincing than Anthony Hopkins here - Hopkins seems the wrong shape, even with all the prosthetics, & too old & wrinkly, where Hitch in real life looked like a man-sized baby pretty much to the grave. His accent, too, comes & goes wildly, never really convincing.

On the other hand, you get a far bigger budget, star-studded movie, whose point of existence is more than simply a feminist agenda depiction of male sexuality as repulsive & predatory. Which is nice.

AND you get to look at Scarlett Johannson a little, which can never be a bad thing.

I guess in an attempt to appeal to a wider female audience (well, they're no going to see it for Alfred Hitchcock's six-pack abs, now are they), the biggest part of the film is devoted to his wife Alma, here portrayed by Helen Mirren as the woman running the show, writing the scripts, mothering little Alfred & still finding time to contemplate an affair with a smarmy hack writer. You go, girl.

In real life, Alma was, it's true, Hitch's longest collaborator & closest confidant, but here she is given way too much credit & comes off - rather laughably - as the real genius while Hitchcock just bumbles around putting no more work into 'Psycho' than simply deciding to make it in the first place. And this is another of the major weak points, that the astonishing technical & artistic accomplishments of The Master in that classic don't factor into the story at ALL, which seems much more content to dwell on generic soap-opera plot devices than the achievements of one of the greatest of all cinema artists. Which is a pity, as surely it is the work of an artist that is the only reason any of us are interested in him in the first place. Correct? In this film, Hitchcock remains a mystery, & we feel no more empathy or understanding for him than in "The Girl". We don't really care anything about him or understand any of his actions - practically all of which are fictionalized anyway. It is Alma we care for & identify with, while Hitch is seemingly used as no more than a famous face, a recognizable brand name, a symbol of some kind, but for what we never learn.

In the end, this is a rather dull film, with nothing much to say & little skill employed in saying it. Because it has no interest or affection for either the artist or the man, it has to make up its screen time by dwelling on or inventing trivial matters to inflate for dramatic gain. Perhaps the most damning failure of all is simply this: that in a film about a man who created some of the most unforgettable images in all of cinema, there is not one single memorable shot of its own. One gets the feeling that once some Hollywood executive came up with the title, they felt it would simply 'write itself'. Unfortunately, it didn't.

Read more IMDb reviews

Comments 106

Be the first to leave a comment